A Hudson Centre perspective on Dr Carla Clark's article The truth about porn shrinking the brain

The recent article by Dr. Clark The truth about porn shrinking the brain is a well-crafted account of the effects that porn can have on the brain. Examining the frequency and type in some studies guided the results of the research to indicate that certain areas are connected with porn use and overuse. As a treatment provider, we educate and support individuals with Porn addiction and help to reduce and alleviate the negative effects that an addiction has for an individual.

In our intensive and structured groups, we work with the latest research material and provide educational lectures that inform the individual of the effects that porn has on the brain. Our programs are structured specifically to examine the hidden dynamics as to what type and frequency of porn is being watched and how to promote abstinence and healthy behaviours that free the individual from the destructive effects that porn can have on the brain and the person as a whole.

Many of our clients have remarked that the intensive program and individual therapy was key for them in establishing new behaviours that promote their health and wellbeing. As a result, it gave them a sense of freedom from their porn addiction.

The article itself makes use of the research into the neurotransmitters released and neural pathways in the brain that are primarily involved in the development of a porn addiction. The Hudson Centre promotes the use of educational material from talks, articles and social media information that communicates the impact that porn has on the brain. We offer a three question exploration for anyone who feels that they may struggle with issues related to their porn use and would like to move towards healthier ways of living.

3 key questions to ask yourself:

  1. What is it that arouses me in the porn that I am watching? Is it the behaviour displayed i.e. violent, dominating, Submissive, staged rape, Sexual strangulation, Pre-teen, Same Sex?
  2. When did Porn use begin and has it escalated since I started? Moving from Soft core magazines to video, progressing to hard core internet pornography?
  3. How did my issue come to be internet/magazine pornographic material as opposed to other activities?

If you are struggling to answer any of these questions or would like support in helping to stop problematic porn addiction, please call The Hudson Centre today on 0207 493 4488 and speak to a trained professional.

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